A Little Post Conviction Discussion

I’m a little late posting this week, mainly because a whole lot came up regarding the very issue I am discussing here. Post conviction work is probably my favorite place to work in the law and, unfortunately, a lot of it goes to attorneys who are court appointed and are thoroughly bored by their jobs. But post conviction appeals can be some of the most rewarding and most galvanizing work that is out there, and the gratification you’ll receive from the client and feel for your worthwhile work will almost outweigh the disappointment when you lose the appeal. So let’s talk post conviction, shall we?

Post Conviction relief often focuses on a few set arguments: ineffective assistance of counsel, breach of one part or another of a fourth amendment right, and the good ole standby, prosecutorial misconduct. (Just as a side not folks, take the arguments professionally, if you’re being called ineffective, don’t let it make you mad, sometimes you’re just a vehicle to getting a second shot at an argument. Sometimes its just the appellate lawyer’s job to call anyone she can incompetent. I usually apologize to the person for having to take that step, but please, don’t take offense.)

Back to prosecutorial misconduct: I’ve read arguments which are great examples of misconduct (usually later deemed harmless error) and I’ve seen arguments that are just a shot in the dark. Rarely have I seen a win, and never in one of my own cases, based on a misconduct argument. But a momentous decision has just come down from the federal courts, and I’d like to discuss it a little, and its possible implications.

The Washington D.C. Circuit Court of appeals just disbarred a federal prosecutor, an action that hasn’t occurred in, reportedly, over ten years. Former assistant U.S. attorney  G. Paul Howes was disbarred for his conduct in a number of high profile murder and gang cases. Howes apparently used vouchers, intended to pay for witnesses’ reasonable expenses, to bribe informants’ relatives and significant others. Not only that, but Howes then repeatedly lied and hid the conduct from the investigators and the court.

Interestingly, the Board on Professional Responsibility voted only for a suspension for Howes’ conduct. Appently, in their mind, bribery and perjury aren’t *that* big of a deal. The Circuit Court disagreed. They disbarred him.

Nine convicted persons have already gotten reduced sentences based on the revelation of the misconduct. How many more are to follow is anyone’s guess, but its certainly a case any appeals lawyer would jump to take on.

Systemically, for appeals lawyers everywhere, not just in Washington DC, does this mean anything? My answer is: Maybe. Although the judicial decision against Howes is not precedent in any way except for cases against other prosecutors, the nine convicted persons’s appeals certainly can be. I also don’t think its necessary to get to the level that Howe was at to find it could be prosecutorial misconduct. There is no need to reach the level of disbarment to achieve something more than a harmless error through misconduct.

If you come upon an issue of prosecutorial misconduct, even if DC Circuit isn’t in your jurisdiction, and even if you’re in a state court, I think you should try to draw the connection. The strength of your argument can only be increased by showing how one instance of prosecutorial misconduct can truly be a long standing practice of misconduct. So try it, and let me know how it goes!